Washington, George, 1732-1799. The writings of George Washington from the original manuscript sources: Volume 5
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To MAJOR GENERAL PHILIP SCHUYLER New York, June 14, 1776.

    Dear Sir: I was favoured with yours of the 10th. Inst. 67 with its Inclosures by last Night's Post. The Stroke meditating by the Indians against our Frontier Inhabitants, is what I have long thought would happen, as they were not engaged in our Interest. But I am in full Hopes you will be able to repel their hostile Designs, and convince them of their Imprudence in joining our Enemies, without the least Cause of Quarrel.

[Note:Schuyler's letter, dated June 10, 1776, is in the Washington Papers. ]

    As to intrenching Tools, I shall direct the Qt. Master to send up some, as early as possible; but in Respect to what you say about Cannon and Ammunition, I am at a Loss whether it is intended as an Application or not. I do not know, that any of the former have been requested, but for the armed Vessels in the Lakes; or of the latter, but what has been sent for the Canada Expedition. I wish you to explain the Matter, and that your Requisitions for Necessaries may be always certain and explicit, as to Quantity and Quality.

    As the Militia to reinforce the Army in Canada, and for keeping open our Communication with that Province or a Part of them, will probably be on their March before long. I think it


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will be advisable for you to write the different Governors furnishing them, of the Routs they should take, and of the Places proper for, their Rendezvous.

    I wrote you Yesterday and on the 9th. Inst. to which I refer you for full Answer to all yours between the 21st. Ulto. and your last. I am, &c.